Preserve and protect 
our community’s 
small-town character.

Let Los Altos voters decide whether to sell, lease, or rezone our City-owned parks, open space, and public/institutional properties.

Preserve and protect 
our community’s 
small-town character.

Let Los Altos voters decide whether to sell, lease, or rezone our City-owned parks, open space, and public/institutional properties.

​Reasons To Vote ​‘Yes​’

Protect Our Valuable Assets

The City’s open spaces, parks and other public properties are among the City’s most valuable assets. They give us all space to live and breathe, away from the pressure and hustle of the Valley. Unfortunately, opponents of Measure C want to allow private development of public lands. Once public lands are gone, they’re gone. YOU – the residents – should make such decisions. Measure C gives you the final say.

A Fair and Transparent Process

Residents are tired of having to mobilize to fight pet projects by Council or sneaky proposals to privatize or develop our land. Measure C requires the City Council to get an affirmative vote from residents to sell, transfer, or rezone city-owned parks, open space, and public/- institutional land, or to lease it to private interests that takes it away from the public. Great ideas will pass, and Council can move forward knowing that the idea has widespread community support.

A Permanent Solution
– for Public Land

Unlike the temporary action Council is debating, Measure C can’t be changed except by another initiative. And, despite what this Council says, Measure C was never just about parks. By including city-owned public/institutional land, Measure C covers the soccer and baseball fields and other land at Hillview (these are NOT parks and will not be “protected” by whatever Council does), the historic apricot orchard, most parking plazas, and other land.

Measure C gives residents the final say on proposals to develop most city-owned land.

​Reasons To Vote ​‘Yes​’

Protect Our Valuable Assets

The City’s open spaces, parks and other public properties are among the City’s most valuable assets. They give us all space to live and breathe, away from the pressure and hustle of the Valley. Unfortunately, opponents of Measure C want to allow private development of public lands. Once public lands are gone, they’re gone. YOU – the residents – should make such decisions. Measure C gives you the final say.


A Fair and Transparent Process

Residents are tired of having to mobilize to fight pet projects by Council or sneaky proposals to privatize or develop our land. Measure C requires the City Council to get an affirmative vote from residents to sell, transfer, or rezone city-owned parks, open space, and public/- institutional land, or to lease it to private interests that takes it away from the public. Great ideas will pass, and Council can move forward knowing that the idea has widespread community support.

A Permanent Solution
– for Public Land

Unlike the temporary action Council is debating, Measure C can’t be changed except by another initiative. And, despite what this Council says, Measure C was never just about parks. By including city-owned public/institutional land, Measure C covers the soccer and baseball fields and other land at Hillview (these are NOT parks and will not be “protected” by whatever Council does), the historic apricot orchard, most parking plazas, and other land.

Measure C gives residents the final say on proposals to develop most city-owned land.

​Learn More

Applies Only to City-owned Land

This measure applies ONLY to:

  • City-owned parks, open space, and public/institutional land.
  • FUTURE actions that would effectively privatize that land – through sale or long-term lease.

Any proposal to sell or lease the Hillview ballfields or apricot orchards ("public/institutional") would require a vote of the people.

Does NOT Affect Public Use

Libraries, fire stations, History Museum, and other public-use buildings are not affected. Measure C cannot be applied retroactively. Opponents will try to confuse and mislead you. Don’t be fooled. Measure C  “applies only to actions that would significantly impact the public character” of City lands by “effectively privatizing these shared spaces” (text of Measure C). If the Council wants to SELL the fire stations or libraries for PRIVATE USE, wouldn’t you want the final say in that decision?

Three Council Members Can​’t Sell Our Land

There are Council elections every two years, usually with one or two new members chosen. Councils have sold public land in the past, and development pressures are increasing. Currently, any three Council members can decide. Measure C gives YOU the final say on the sale of specific types of city-owned land — that is parks, open space and public/institutional. Council can sell other public holdings of residential or commercial property without a public vote.

Four Elections Per Year — NO Waiting

The City takes years to decide to do anything. The County Registrar of Voter schedules four elections per year (per the City's own report). There is no reason for any special elections at the outrageous costs asserted by opponents of Measure C. What will it cost? LESS than what the City Manager is allowed to spend whenever he wants WITHOUT Council approval! Once the land is sold, it’s gone. What is it worth to be sure the community really wants to give up a piece of our land — permanently?

Measure C guarantees that the politicians or the power brokers cannot push pet projects that cost us the use of our land without putting it to a vote of the residents.

​Learn More

Applies Only to City-owned Land

This measure applies ONLY to:

  • City-owned parks, open space, and public/institutional land.
  • FUTURE actions that would effectively privatize that land – through sale or long-term lease.

Any proposal to sell or lease the Hillview ballfields or apricot orchards ("public/institutional") would require a vote of the people.

Does NOT Affect Public Use

Libraries, fire stations, History Museum, and other public-use buildings are not affected. Measure C cannot be applied retroactively. Opponents will try to confuse and mislead you. Don’t be fooled. Measure C  “applies only to actions that would significantly impact the public character” of City lands by “effectively privatizing these shared spaces” (text of Measure C). If the Council wants to SELL the fire stations or libraries for PRIVATE USE, wouldn’t you want the final say in that decision?

Three Council Members Can​’t Sell Our Land

There are Council elections every two years, usually with one or two new members chosen. Councils have sold public land in the past, and development pressures are increasing. Currently, any three Council members can decide. Measure C gives YOU the final say on the sale of specific types of city-owned land — that is parks, open space and public/institutional. Council can sell other public holdings of residential or commercial property without a public vote.

Four Elections Per Year — NO Waiting

The City takes years to decide to do anything. The County Registrar of Voter schedules four elections per year (per the City's own report). There is no reason for any special elections at the outrageous costs asserted by opponents of Measure C. What will it cost? LESS than what the City Manager is allowed to spend whenever he wants WITHOUT Council approval! Once the land is sold, it’s gone. What is it worth to be sure the community really wants to give up a piece of our land — permanently?

Measure C guarantees that the politicians or the power brokers cannot push pet projects that cost us the use of our land without putting it to a vote of the residents.

​Myth Busters

Fact: It is common practice when opposing a ballot measure to try to confuse the issue, hoping to confuse the voters. When voters are confused, they typically vote ‘No.’ 

 

  • Myth: Measure C will interfere with Library and Fire Station leases and renewals.

    Fact: Measure C does not affect the fire stations, libraries, Neutra House, History Museum, LASD maintenance yard, etc. Measure C doesn’t touch existing leases now, or upon renewal, or in the future, as long as the property is used for a public purpose. Leases only require a vote if the lease would PRIVATIZE the Public land. That is the whole point of Measure C – to give residents the final say on whether to PRIVATIZE OUR PUBLIC LAND.

    For example: As long as the PUBLIC library is used for PUBLIC purposes, there is no need for a vote on any lease or renewal – or even for a new lease if there is a new building. If the city wants to lease PUBLIC land to a PRIVATE entity that fundamentally changes the public character of the property, that action would require a vote. Read the text yourself:

    • “This Initiative Applies Only to Actions that Would Significantly Impact the Public Character of Lands Owned by the City of Los Altos.” ( Section I, C.5.)
    • Measure C requires “voter approval for actions that would effectively privatize these shared spaces….” (Section I, C.5.)
    • Measure C requires “voter approval for actions that would alter the public character of these lands” (Section I. B.)
  • Myth: There will be a lot of elections that will cost up to $500,000 or else we would have to wait up to 2 years for an election under Measure C.

    Fact: Elections should be RARE unless Council is planning to sell or lease a lot of our public lands in ways they have never done. Of the 13 leases identified by the city as being in force – going back over 40 years – ONLY ONE would have required a vote.

    If the city is planning to SELL the land for PRIVATE use, it requires a vote. NONE of the land that would be covered by Measure C has been sold – yet.

    So why the scare tactics? There are four elections each year by the Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters. If the city plans well, they will combine any required vote with another election and the cost will be less than $50,000, not the outrageous $500,000 claimed by opponents of Measure C. Los Altos has NEVER paid that for an election – even when Council called a special election to try to pass Measure A in 2015 (which failed). If Council wants to sell or lease a multi-million dollar piece of PUBLIC land for PRIVATE use, $50,000 is a small price to pay for our residents to decide whether to give up our public land.

    Why are the opponents of Measure C misleading and trying to scare the public? What do the special interests and power brokers have planned?

In summary, Measure C is a well-written initiative that clearly and repeatedly says that it will apply only to actions that would “Significantly Impact the Public Character of Lands Owned by the City of Los Altos,” actions that would “effectively privatize” City land (See Initiative, Section 1, Findings, C.5.), and “alter the public character of theses lands (See Initiative, Section 1, Effect, B). 

 

It will not affect any current leases or agreements, or any amendments or renewals, as long as there is no significant change in the public character of the land and its use. Such actions should be rare, and a vote for them should be easily planned for minimum expense, given the magnitude of the potential permanent loss of the public use of the land. For five months, opponents have tried to find some basis for opposing this residents’ initiative. They have failed. The real purpose of their efforts is to scare people and thereby retain complete control over public land in the hands of three council members and their cronies. Don’t let their false claims sway you. Vote YES on Measure C.  

​News & Events

September 3 Labor Day marks the last days of summer and the beginning of our campaign for Measure C. Call 650-209-8232 to get your yard sign or to volunteer for the campaign.
August 20 “Lies, damned lies, and statistics” We just reviewed the ballot material that the opposition wrote for the voters’ handbook. The deceptive information shows how desperate the politicians and power brokers are to defeat the citizens’ initiative – Measure C. We’ll deconstruct and print the truth in upcoming weeks.
August 10 We did it! After collecting over 2,900 signatures in just  17 days when we only needed 2,100, MEASURE C is officially on the ballot. Los Altans want to Preserve Los Altos' Character.

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Yes On Los Altos Measure C

© 2018 Paid for by Committee for Yes on C • FPPC ID Number 1405097